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Santee rig tutorial
#1
If you would like to see how to tie a Santee rig this YouTube video is excellent. Also shows a simple way to snell a hook on the end of a piece of line. Very handy for catfishing. This fellow has a lot of other catfishing videos if that interests you.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w6Yg_Yn7...ZFhPro%3A6
I would rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on earth.  - Steve McQueen
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#2
its the only rig i use for cats!
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#3
I can understand that. Recently I started using flaits and fligs also. Haven't gotten scientific enough to know which one catches most fish but they all seem about equal.
I would rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on earth.  - Steve McQueen
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#4
I have watch his videos before. Good information. I wonder why he doesn’t like the sinker slides anymore.

What do most people around here prefer to use on their Santee rig, a sliding sinker or a fixed sinker?
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#5
(06-17-2020, 07:03 PM)BSF Wrote: I have watch his videos before. Good information. I wonder why he doesn’t like the sinker slides anymore.

What do most people around here prefer to use on their Santee rig, a sliding sinker or a fixed sinker?
There are a whole lot of variables in how you make and present a Santee rig.   The water you are fishing, the depth and bottom conditions, the size bait and other factors should all be considered as you put your rigs together.

In Utah Lake, the average depth is less than 10 feet.  During most months we will be fishing in only half that depth.  So, unless you are dragging a big bait at a fairly good speed you don't need a lot of weight.  You want to keep the weight on the bottom but not increase the chances of snagging...especially in areas with at least intermittent rocks.  And in very rocky bottom areas forget dragging bottom.

Some catters opt for sliding sinkers.  But since large cats are not delicate when they take off with a large bait you don't need to be able to feel them breathe on it.  So a direct connect sinker will usually get by...with less hardware and fancy rigging.  It always boils down to personal preferences...based on your own experience and gut feel.

Here is a copy and paste website article that might provide some added insight and ideas.


Attached Files
.pdf   Santee Cooper Rig For Catfish.pdf (Size: 589.26 KB / Downloads: 13)
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#6
(06-17-2020, 07:18 PM),TubeDude Wrote:
(06-17-2020, 07:03 PM)BSF Wrote: I have watch his videos before. Good information. I wonder why he doesn’t like the sinker slides anymore.

What do most people around here prefer to use on their Santee rig, a sliding sinker or a fixed sinker?
There are a whole lot of variables in how you make and present a Santee rig.   The water you are fishing, the depth and bottom conditions, the size bait and other factors should all be considered as you put your rigs together.

In Utah Lake, the average depth is less than 10 feet.  During most months we will be fishing in only half that depth.  So, unless you are dragging a big bait at a fairly good speed you don't need a lot of weight.  You want to keep the weight on the bottom but not increase the chances of snagging...especially in areas with at least intermittent rocks.  And in very rocky bottom areas forget dragging bottom.

Some catters opt for sliding sinkers.  But since large cats are not delicate when they take off with a large bait you don't need to be able to feel them breathe on it.  So a direct connect sinker will usually get by...with less hardware and fancy rigging.  It always boils down to personal preferences...based on your own experience and gut feel.

Here is a copy and paste website article that might provide some added insight and ideas.
Thanks for the information and attached article.
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#7
i like a 3 inch peg float and only use a 1oz flat no roll river sinker on a slider, a 3 inch float will hold up a fairly large bait! they hold alot more weight than the demon dragons as cool as they look theyre over priced and just as effective as a standard float.
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